Statelessness From the View of Hannah Arendt to Present International Law

Statelessness From the View of Hannah Arendt to Present International Law

Abstract UNHCR estimates that there are approximately over 12 million stateless persons in the world. Due to gaps in data collection by governments, the UN, and civil society, a full breakdown of this figure is beyond reach. The stateless are, in effect, the rightless because the loss of citizenship in the nation-state dynamic also means…Read More

Thinking Global Local And Why We Should Care About The Environment, Climate Change

Thinking Global Local And Why We Should Care About The Environment, Climate Change

Abstract Climate change is a major problem caused by human activities or human mismanagement of the environment, resulting in several direct and indirect impacts on man’s health and the planet. These man-induced changes have wide-range harmful effects, including, increase in heat-related mortality, dehydration, the spread of infectious diseases, malnutrition, damages to public infrastructure, forced migration…Read More

The ‘Humanity’ in Humanitarian Intervention: A Critical Analysis

The ‘Humanity’ in Humanitarian Intervention: A Critical Analysis

Abstract The concept of Humanitarian intervention has been discussed in International Relations discourse as well as under International Law. It is used as an acceptable practice under International Law and a normative practice of the states. However, it seems that such a practice is contradictory to the basic principles of International Law because the authority…Read More

Economic Migration and Human Rights in Bangladesh

Abstract International migration has an effective contribution to economic development in Bangladesh. But sometimes they have faced inhuman behavior, which is against labor law. Bangladesh government has few institutions, who are dealing with the migration process including labor rights. There is some theoretical explanation as to why so many people going out. In this article,…Read More

International Relations After the Cold War

International Relations After the Cold War: Violent Democracies, Hegemonism, and Deprivation

Abstract The paper analyzes the post-cold war contemporary geopolitics from the political, economic, and security framework, presenting the concepts and reflections on the international relations focusing on war and peace modalities within a discourse of democracy, hegemonism, global deprivation, and inequalities. It emphasizes the point of view that strengthens the global onslaught humankind despondency paradigm of…Read More

Fall of the Oyo Empire

Fall of the Oyo Empire: Causes, Consequences and Lessons for Modern Day Nigeria

ABSTRACT In his essay  ‘Fate of Empires” soldier, diplomat, and traveler LT-General Sir John Glove analyze the life cycle of empires; he found remarkable similarities between them all. From the early founding fathers who worked to develop the state to the final corrupt over-ambitious leaders who become a burden on the state. It must be…Read More

Community Based Youth Activity with Turn To Positive

Back in 2018, 1st June, Turn To Positive was established to promote mental health and accessing information about it. Turn To Positive is a youth-led community-based volunteer organization. Since its establishment, Turn To Positive has continuously engaged in social activities at the ground level and organized workshops and seminars with national and international organizations. During…Read More

Peacekeeping Operations As Implied Power Of The United Nations: A Critical Assessment

Peacekeeping Operations As Implied Power Of The United Nations: A Critical Assessment

Abstract: The International Organization should not be limited by those powers granted to it upon its creation, i.e. attributed powers instead be allowed to exercise certain powers that are not granted expressly but are granted by implications, i.e. implied powers. The United Nations, as an international organization, was established in 1945 to save people from…Read More

How the Media Fuels Australia’s Greatest Racial Divide

How the Media Fuels Australia’s Greatest Racial Divide

Abstract Sudanese Australians have been misrepresented in the media as “criminal[s]” and the enforcers of gang brutality, falsely rendering them “(unable) to settle successfully in Australia” (Nunn 2010, p. 183-185). The Sudanese community in Australia, particularly Victoria, is generally portrayed in media forms such as journalism and social media as the perpetrators of youth violence…Read More